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Visiting Instruments


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Visiting Instruments

In the past visiting instruments have been made available to the wider UKIRT community on a collaborative basis, sometimes also in exchange for telescope time or support from PATT. These instruments are described below.

At the present time, no visitor instruments are scheduled to be used at UKIRT.

TRISPEC

TRISPEC, the Nagoya University multi-channel imaging spectrometer, had its first UKIRT run in February 2000 and a more extended period in August 2000. The instrument returned to UKIRT in February and March 2001 when a number of PATT and UH runs were successfully completed. TRISPEC is not scheduled to return to UKIRT at the present time.

More details on TRISPEC can be found here.

MIRAC2

MIRAC2 was a mid-Infrared Array Camera which utilised a Rockwell HF16 128 x 128 Si:As hybrid BIB array. The MIRAC2 camera was built as a collaborative effort by the University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Naval Reseach Laboratory.

The camera provides achromatic diffraction limited imaging at UKIRT with a nominal scale of 0.27 arcsec/pixel, with zoom capability from 0.20 to 0.40 arcsec/pixel. Available filters with their band widths are as follows : 2.2, 3.8, 4.8 (all 16%); 7.9 (4%); 8.8, 9.8, 10.3, 11.7, 12.5 (all 10%); 17.4, 17.8 (2.6%), 18.0 (10%); 20.6 (6.8%), N (8.1-13.1), 1.8%CVF (7.7-14.5).

When visiting UKIRT, the MIRCAC2 team comprised Bill Hoffmann, Giovanni Fazio, Lynne Deutsch, and Joe Hora. The team were based at the University of Arizona.

MICS

MICS (Mid-Infrared Camera/Spectrometer) was a prototype instrument for 10 microns built in Japan by a team developing a similar but more advanced instrument for Subaru.

Contact: Tom Kerr. Updated: Mon Sep 27 14:27:13 HST 2004

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